Circularity Gap Report, Norway

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The Circularity Gap Report Norway is an in-depth analysis of how Norway consumes raw materials—metals, fossil fuels, biomass and minerals—to fuel its societal needs. Currently, 97.6% of materials consumed each year never make it back into the economy. Norway also has one of the highest per capita consumption rates in the world at 44.3 tonnes per person.

In the face of the climate emergency and the EU's decision to strive for full circularity, Norway's need for a circular transition is urgent. Our report shows that the country can become 45.8% circular by restructuring business and industry. The report dives into six scenarios for a potential way forward and explores how governments and businesses can facilitate circular consumption and prepare the labour market for the transition. With a good tripartite cooperation in Norwegian employment, a highly-educated and digitally competent population and a long history with renewable energy and plastic recycling, Norway is well set to become a pioneer in the circular economy.

August 27, 2020

Circularity Gap Report, Norway

The Circularity Gap Report, Norway provides an insight into Norway's current state of circularity and gives recommendations for a circular path forward.

The Circularity Gap Report Norway is an in-depth analysis of how Norway consumes raw materials—metals, fossil fuels, biomass and minerals—to fuel its societal needs. Currently, 97.6% of materials consumed each year never make it back into the economy. Norway also has one of the highest per capita consumption rates in the world at 44.3 tonnes per person.

In the face of the climate emergency and the EU's decision to strive for full circularity, Norway's need for a circular transition is urgent. Our report shows that the country can become 45.8% circular by restructuring business and industry. The report dives into six scenarios for a potential way forward and explores how governments and businesses can facilitate circular consumption and prepare the labour market for the transition. With a good tripartite cooperation in Norwegian employment, a highly-educated and digitally competent population and a long history with renewable energy and plastic recycling, Norway is well set to become a pioneer in the circular economy.

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August 26, 2020

Circularity Gap Report, Norway

Circularity Gap Report, Norway

The Circularity Gap Report Norway is an in-depth analysis of how Norway consumes raw materials—metals, fossil fuels, biomass and minerals—to fuel its societal needs. Currently, 97.6% of materials consumed each year never make it back into the economy. Norway also has one of the highest per capita consumption rates in the world at 44.3 tonnes per person.

In the face of the climate emergency and the EU's decision to strive for full circularity, Norway's need for a circular transition is urgent. Our report shows that the country can become 45.8% circular by restructuring business and industry. The report dives into six scenarios for a potential way forward and explores how governments and businesses can facilitate circular consumption and prepare the labour market for the transition. With a good tripartite cooperation in Norwegian employment, a highly-educated and digitally competent population and a long history with renewable energy and plastic recycling, Norway is well set to become a pioneer in the circular economy.

Circularity Gap Report, Norway

The Norwegian economy is only 2.4% circular, but with the right interventions, Norway could increase its circularity up twenty times.

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The Circularity Gap Report Norway is an in-depth analysis of how Norway consumes raw materials—metals, fossil fuels, biomass and minerals—to fuel its societal needs. Currently, 97.6% of materials consumed each year never make it back into the economy. Norway also has one of the highest per capita consumption rates in the world at 44.3 tonnes per person.

In the face of the climate emergency and the EU's decision to strive for full circularity, Norway's need for a circular transition is urgent. Our report shows that the country can become 45.8% circular by restructuring business and industry. The report dives into six scenarios for a potential way forward and explores how governments and businesses can facilitate circular consumption and prepare the labour market for the transition. With a good tripartite cooperation in Norwegian employment, a highly-educated and digitally competent population and a long history with renewable energy and plastic recycling, Norway is well set to become a pioneer in the circular economy.

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Circularity Gap Report, Norway

The Norwegian economy is only 2.4% circular, but with the right interventions, Norway could increase its circularity up twenty times.

Downloads

No items found.

The Circularity Gap Report Norway is an in-depth analysis of how Norway consumes raw materials—metals, fossil fuels, biomass and minerals—to fuel its societal needs. Currently, 97.6% of materials consumed each year never make it back into the economy. Norway also has one of the highest per capita consumption rates in the world at 44.3 tonnes per person.

In the face of the climate emergency and the EU's decision to strive for full circularity, Norway's need for a circular transition is urgent. Our report shows that the country can become 45.8% circular by restructuring business and industry. The report dives into six scenarios for a potential way forward and explores how governments and businesses can facilitate circular consumption and prepare the labour market for the transition. With a good tripartite cooperation in Norwegian employment, a highly-educated and digitally competent population and a long history with renewable energy and plastic recycling, Norway is well set to become a pioneer in the circular economy.

STAY IN THE LOOP

GDPR Permissions and Content Preferences:

Thank you for signing up!

To complete the subscription process, please click the link in the email we just sent you.
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.