Your circular logistics challenges and how to tackle them

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How do logistics shape, enable and/or support the circular economy? And how to integrate circular (business) concepts and logistics in existing activities and make it commercially viable? These issues and more where point of discussion during the latest member Deep Dive on March 22 at FreedomLab, Amsterdam.Three panelists from the member community- Branko Schuurman (DHL), Florens Slob (Van Gansewinkel) and Rob Kragt (Desso) - engaged in a lively discussion with each other and the audience.The costs of take-back mechanisms and reverse logistics is often one of the biggest challenges for businesses engaged in circular concepts. Companies and business are currently dealing with not enough or fluctuating demand to make reverse logistics commercially feasible. For example, there is a huge amount of household and small technical equipment, such as cameras and cell phones, lying unused in people’s drawers and attics. These products, or at least some of the materials in them, have high residual value. Currently there hardly is an incentive to bring them back. What could and should be done to change this?Perception of value is another important aspects. As long as people perceive unused items as waste, there will be no trigger nor a perceived personal gain to bring products back. Consumers should be well aware that their end of life products are very valuable. On the logistics and costing side, companies are looking for possibilities to collect products/materials more efficiently. Technological developments, such as the internet of things, and tools for consumers getting involved in first and last mile logistics could have a huge impact.From the perspective of creating, using and optimizing circular logistics solutions, it is essential for all sectors to consider the entire supply chain rather than all the separate links. The strength of logistics lies not in optimising the quantity of transported tonnes per kilometre, but in the value (people, planet, profit) that is added per kilometre of transported goods. The need for return and service logistics is only increasing. Therefor a more vital question should be: which part of the value could be mine, what other value is created or cost prevented and where do I fit in the whole chain? There are still more than enough questions left unanswered and we are curious to see how the field of circular logistics will develop.

“Although it’s just a 2 hr meeting, this deep dive had the right angle, the right people to get into a intensive, in depth and lively discussion on this topic. These meetings leads to new partnerships and the ability to meet other companies (and people) willing to make a change and towards a circular economy.”Florens Slob, Director Business Development at Van Gansewinkel

Quarterly sector- or industry based Member Deep Dives are part of the membership offering. They are an excellent way for the Circle Community to meet, share insights, learnings and real life issues on specific topics, and contribute to creating business opportunities for and between members.To become a member, or learn more about the membership click here, or contact us directly via membership@circle-economy.com.

March 25, 2016

Your circular logistics challenges and how to tackle them

How do logistics shape, enable and/or support the circular economy? And how to integrate circular (business) concepts and logistics in existing activities and make it commercially viable? These issues and more where point of discussion during the latest member Deep Dive on March 22 at FreedomLab, Amsterdam.Three panelists from the member community- Branko Schuurman (DHL), Florens Slob (Van Gansewinkel) and Rob Kragt (Desso) - engaged in a lively discussion with each other and the audience.The costs of take-back mechanisms and reverse logistics is often one of the biggest challenges for businesses engaged in circular concepts. Companies and business are currently dealing with not enough or fluctuating demand to make reverse logistics commercially feasible. For example, there is a huge amount of household and small technical equipment, such as cameras and cell phones, lying unused in people’s drawers and attics. These products, or at least some of the materials in them, have high residual value. Currently there hardly is an incentive to bring them back. What could and should be done to change this?Perception of value is another important aspects. As long as people perceive unused items as waste, there will be no trigger nor a perceived personal gain to bring products back. Consumers should be well aware that their end of life products are very valuable. On the logistics and costing side, companies are looking for possibilities to collect products/materials more efficiently. Technological developments, such as the internet of things, and tools for consumers getting involved in first and last mile logistics could have a huge impact.From the perspective of creating, using and optimizing circular logistics solutions, it is essential for all sectors to consider the entire supply chain rather than all the separate links. The strength of logistics lies not in optimising the quantity of transported tonnes per kilometre, but in the value (people, planet, profit) that is added per kilometre of transported goods. The need for return and service logistics is only increasing. Therefor a more vital question should be: which part of the value could be mine, what other value is created or cost prevented and where do I fit in the whole chain? There are still more than enough questions left unanswered and we are curious to see how the field of circular logistics will develop.

“Although it’s just a 2 hr meeting, this deep dive had the right angle, the right people to get into a intensive, in depth and lively discussion on this topic. These meetings leads to new partnerships and the ability to meet other companies (and people) willing to make a change and towards a circular economy.”Florens Slob, Director Business Development at Van Gansewinkel

Quarterly sector- or industry based Member Deep Dives are part of the membership offering. They are an excellent way for the Circle Community to meet, share insights, learnings and real life issues on specific topics, and contribute to creating business opportunities for and between members.To become a member, or learn more about the membership click here, or contact us directly via membership@circle-economy.com.

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December 5, 2019

Your circular logistics challenges and how to tackle them

Your circular logistics challenges and how to tackle them

How do logistics shape, enable and/or support the circular economy? And how to integrate circular (business) concepts and logistics in existing activities and make it commercially viable? These issues and more where point of discussion during the latest member Deep Dive on March 22 at FreedomLab, Amsterdam.Three panelists from the member community- Branko Schuurman (DHL), Florens Slob (Van Gansewinkel) and Rob Kragt (Desso) - engaged in a lively discussion with each other and the audience.The costs of take-back mechanisms and reverse logistics is often one of the biggest challenges for businesses engaged in circular concepts. Companies and business are currently dealing with not enough or fluctuating demand to make reverse logistics commercially feasible. For example, there is a huge amount of household and small technical equipment, such as cameras and cell phones, lying unused in people’s drawers and attics. These products, or at least some of the materials in them, have high residual value. Currently there hardly is an incentive to bring them back. What could and should be done to change this?Perception of value is another important aspects. As long as people perceive unused items as waste, there will be no trigger nor a perceived personal gain to bring products back. Consumers should be well aware that their end of life products are very valuable. On the logistics and costing side, companies are looking for possibilities to collect products/materials more efficiently. Technological developments, such as the internet of things, and tools for consumers getting involved in first and last mile logistics could have a huge impact.From the perspective of creating, using and optimizing circular logistics solutions, it is essential for all sectors to consider the entire supply chain rather than all the separate links. The strength of logistics lies not in optimising the quantity of transported tonnes per kilometre, but in the value (people, planet, profit) that is added per kilometre of transported goods. The need for return and service logistics is only increasing. Therefor a more vital question should be: which part of the value could be mine, what other value is created or cost prevented and where do I fit in the whole chain? There are still more than enough questions left unanswered and we are curious to see how the field of circular logistics will develop.

“Although it’s just a 2 hr meeting, this deep dive had the right angle, the right people to get into a intensive, in depth and lively discussion on this topic. These meetings leads to new partnerships and the ability to meet other companies (and people) willing to make a change and towards a circular economy.”Florens Slob, Director Business Development at Van Gansewinkel

Quarterly sector- or industry based Member Deep Dives are part of the membership offering. They are an excellent way for the Circle Community to meet, share insights, learnings and real life issues on specific topics, and contribute to creating business opportunities for and between members.To become a member, or learn more about the membership click here, or contact us directly via membership@circle-economy.com.

Your circular logistics challenges and how to tackle them

Downloads

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How do logistics shape, enable and/or support the circular economy? And how to integrate circular (business) concepts and logistics in existing activities and make it commercially viable? These issues and more where point of discussion during the latest member Deep Dive on March 22 at FreedomLab, Amsterdam.Three panelists from the member community- Branko Schuurman (DHL), Florens Slob (Van Gansewinkel) and Rob Kragt (Desso) - engaged in a lively discussion with each other and the audience.The costs of take-back mechanisms and reverse logistics is often one of the biggest challenges for businesses engaged in circular concepts. Companies and business are currently dealing with not enough or fluctuating demand to make reverse logistics commercially feasible. For example, there is a huge amount of household and small technical equipment, such as cameras and cell phones, lying unused in people’s drawers and attics. These products, or at least some of the materials in them, have high residual value. Currently there hardly is an incentive to bring them back. What could and should be done to change this?Perception of value is another important aspects. As long as people perceive unused items as waste, there will be no trigger nor a perceived personal gain to bring products back. Consumers should be well aware that their end of life products are very valuable. On the logistics and costing side, companies are looking for possibilities to collect products/materials more efficiently. Technological developments, such as the internet of things, and tools for consumers getting involved in first and last mile logistics could have a huge impact.From the perspective of creating, using and optimizing circular logistics solutions, it is essential for all sectors to consider the entire supply chain rather than all the separate links. The strength of logistics lies not in optimising the quantity of transported tonnes per kilometre, but in the value (people, planet, profit) that is added per kilometre of transported goods. The need for return and service logistics is only increasing. Therefor a more vital question should be: which part of the value could be mine, what other value is created or cost prevented and where do I fit in the whole chain? There are still more than enough questions left unanswered and we are curious to see how the field of circular logistics will develop.

“Although it’s just a 2 hr meeting, this deep dive had the right angle, the right people to get into a intensive, in depth and lively discussion on this topic. These meetings leads to new partnerships and the ability to meet other companies (and people) willing to make a change and towards a circular economy.”Florens Slob, Director Business Development at Van Gansewinkel

Quarterly sector- or industry based Member Deep Dives are part of the membership offering. They are an excellent way for the Circle Community to meet, share insights, learnings and real life issues on specific topics, and contribute to creating business opportunities for and between members.To become a member, or learn more about the membership click here, or contact us directly via membership@circle-economy.com.

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Your circular logistics challenges and how to tackle them

Downloads

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How do logistics shape, enable and/or support the circular economy? And how to integrate circular (business) concepts and logistics in existing activities and make it commercially viable? These issues and more where point of discussion during the latest member Deep Dive on March 22 at FreedomLab, Amsterdam.Three panelists from the member community- Branko Schuurman (DHL), Florens Slob (Van Gansewinkel) and Rob Kragt (Desso) - engaged in a lively discussion with each other and the audience.The costs of take-back mechanisms and reverse logistics is often one of the biggest challenges for businesses engaged in circular concepts. Companies and business are currently dealing with not enough or fluctuating demand to make reverse logistics commercially feasible. For example, there is a huge amount of household and small technical equipment, such as cameras and cell phones, lying unused in people’s drawers and attics. These products, or at least some of the materials in them, have high residual value. Currently there hardly is an incentive to bring them back. What could and should be done to change this?Perception of value is another important aspects. As long as people perceive unused items as waste, there will be no trigger nor a perceived personal gain to bring products back. Consumers should be well aware that their end of life products are very valuable. On the logistics and costing side, companies are looking for possibilities to collect products/materials more efficiently. Technological developments, such as the internet of things, and tools for consumers getting involved in first and last mile logistics could have a huge impact.From the perspective of creating, using and optimizing circular logistics solutions, it is essential for all sectors to consider the entire supply chain rather than all the separate links. The strength of logistics lies not in optimising the quantity of transported tonnes per kilometre, but in the value (people, planet, profit) that is added per kilometre of transported goods. The need for return and service logistics is only increasing. Therefor a more vital question should be: which part of the value could be mine, what other value is created or cost prevented and where do I fit in the whole chain? There are still more than enough questions left unanswered and we are curious to see how the field of circular logistics will develop.

“Although it’s just a 2 hr meeting, this deep dive had the right angle, the right people to get into a intensive, in depth and lively discussion on this topic. These meetings leads to new partnerships and the ability to meet other companies (and people) willing to make a change and towards a circular economy.”Florens Slob, Director Business Development at Van Gansewinkel

Quarterly sector- or industry based Member Deep Dives are part of the membership offering. They are an excellent way for the Circle Community to meet, share insights, learnings and real life issues on specific topics, and contribute to creating business opportunities for and between members.To become a member, or learn more about the membership click here, or contact us directly via membership@circle-economy.com.

STAY IN THE LOOP

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Thank you for signing up!

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