The Economy as Art

Download Download

Inspired by Tate Modern London - a blog by Guido BraamEvery blog that is written at the end of the year is undoubtedly related to the transition from one year to the next. Although we can memorize past days and imagine days to come all year long, when January is near, it is simply in our nature to reflect on where we are.I realized during our Annual General Meeting at the Crossboat at the Ceuvel that I’ve always found it difficult to define how successful the past year was. While our members hang their warm winter coats in this brand new meeting space, I quickly go over my presentation about Circle Economy’s results for 2014. I’m very proud of what we have achieved in just one year, but a little voice inside my head questions whether our hard work really brought us closer to the circular economy. Meanwhile, our founder Robert-Jan van Ogtrop welcomes our members.My mind wanders off to a lovely weekend with my wife in London, and to our visit to the Tate Modern Museum. Although the featured works are amazing, it is the historical overview of artists that have impacted how art developed, painted on a huge wall on the first floor, that struck me most of all. It is so impressive to see how the perception of what art is and should be changes over time, how artists challenge and reinforce each other, and how even I, a complete art novice, know what different schools of art, like Bauhaus or Impressionism, are.A bigger contrast with what currently dominates our society is hard to imagine. Although we’ve made the economy the centerpiece of civilization, we hardly know anything about its different schools of thoughts. And yet we could learn so much from the changing perspectives in our economy. The development of the steam engine is seen as a driving factor for the industrial revolution, but we should never forget that it was one of many developments that shaped how communities and companies organized themselves, from resource use to family life to even art. The industrial revolution didn’t happen in one year, it took decades, maybe even a full century. There were winners that saw the future and moved with it. And there were losers that tried to hold on to the past for too long.… “And now Guido will tell you all about what happened in 2014!”, I suddenly hear. In a split second I am back at the General Annual Meeting, enthusiastically talking about all the small steps we took that might become big leaps towards irreversible change one day.Usually, a development like the industrial revolution or a new movement in art takes some time to be recognized and named. How different that is for the circular economy. It is still in its infancy, but we’ve already labeled it. And maybe that explains why we are so impatient. If it is so logical, then why isn’t our economy circular yet? We live in exponential times in many ways, and we expect disruption to happen overnight. The reality is that we have to work hard to make a circular economy happen, that we have to create little pieces of art everyday that all together paint the circular picture.The Annual General Meeting comes to an end. The members agree to appoint Herman Wijffels as new board member of the Circle Economy Cooperative. I deeply respect this man, for it was because of his wise words that I came to understand that we human beings have a shared conscious, that is slowly beginning to understand that we have entered a new era. A new era that requires a new way of thinking and (inter)acting, that we are not fully able to grasp yet. We are entering an era in which entrepreneurs are the artists of our time. I would love to see whose names will show up on the historical overview of artists that made the transition towards a circular economy happen.I wish you all the best for 2015!Picture: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tate_Modern

December 16, 2014

The Economy as Art

Inspired by Tate Modern London - a blog by Guido Braam

Inspired by Tate Modern London - a blog by Guido BraamEvery blog that is written at the end of the year is undoubtedly related to the transition from one year to the next. Although we can memorize past days and imagine days to come all year long, when January is near, it is simply in our nature to reflect on where we are.I realized during our Annual General Meeting at the Crossboat at the Ceuvel that I’ve always found it difficult to define how successful the past year was. While our members hang their warm winter coats in this brand new meeting space, I quickly go over my presentation about Circle Economy’s results for 2014. I’m very proud of what we have achieved in just one year, but a little voice inside my head questions whether our hard work really brought us closer to the circular economy. Meanwhile, our founder Robert-Jan van Ogtrop welcomes our members.My mind wanders off to a lovely weekend with my wife in London, and to our visit to the Tate Modern Museum. Although the featured works are amazing, it is the historical overview of artists that have impacted how art developed, painted on a huge wall on the first floor, that struck me most of all. It is so impressive to see how the perception of what art is and should be changes over time, how artists challenge and reinforce each other, and how even I, a complete art novice, know what different schools of art, like Bauhaus or Impressionism, are.A bigger contrast with what currently dominates our society is hard to imagine. Although we’ve made the economy the centerpiece of civilization, we hardly know anything about its different schools of thoughts. And yet we could learn so much from the changing perspectives in our economy. The development of the steam engine is seen as a driving factor for the industrial revolution, but we should never forget that it was one of many developments that shaped how communities and companies organized themselves, from resource use to family life to even art. The industrial revolution didn’t happen in one year, it took decades, maybe even a full century. There were winners that saw the future and moved with it. And there were losers that tried to hold on to the past for too long.… “And now Guido will tell you all about what happened in 2014!”, I suddenly hear. In a split second I am back at the General Annual Meeting, enthusiastically talking about all the small steps we took that might become big leaps towards irreversible change one day.Usually, a development like the industrial revolution or a new movement in art takes some time to be recognized and named. How different that is for the circular economy. It is still in its infancy, but we’ve already labeled it. And maybe that explains why we are so impatient. If it is so logical, then why isn’t our economy circular yet? We live in exponential times in many ways, and we expect disruption to happen overnight. The reality is that we have to work hard to make a circular economy happen, that we have to create little pieces of art everyday that all together paint the circular picture.The Annual General Meeting comes to an end. The members agree to appoint Herman Wijffels as new board member of the Circle Economy Cooperative. I deeply respect this man, for it was because of his wise words that I came to understand that we human beings have a shared conscious, that is slowly beginning to understand that we have entered a new era. A new era that requires a new way of thinking and (inter)acting, that we are not fully able to grasp yet. We are entering an era in which entrepreneurs are the artists of our time. I would love to see whose names will show up on the historical overview of artists that made the transition towards a circular economy happen.I wish you all the best for 2015!Picture: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tate_Modern

STAY IN THE LOOP

GDPR Permissions and Content Preferences:

Thank you for signing up!

To complete the subscription process, please click the link in the email we just sent you.
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
December 5, 2019

The Economy as Art

The Economy as Art

Inspired by Tate Modern London - a blog by Guido BraamEvery blog that is written at the end of the year is undoubtedly related to the transition from one year to the next. Although we can memorize past days and imagine days to come all year long, when January is near, it is simply in our nature to reflect on where we are.I realized during our Annual General Meeting at the Crossboat at the Ceuvel that I’ve always found it difficult to define how successful the past year was. While our members hang their warm winter coats in this brand new meeting space, I quickly go over my presentation about Circle Economy’s results for 2014. I’m very proud of what we have achieved in just one year, but a little voice inside my head questions whether our hard work really brought us closer to the circular economy. Meanwhile, our founder Robert-Jan van Ogtrop welcomes our members.My mind wanders off to a lovely weekend with my wife in London, and to our visit to the Tate Modern Museum. Although the featured works are amazing, it is the historical overview of artists that have impacted how art developed, painted on a huge wall on the first floor, that struck me most of all. It is so impressive to see how the perception of what art is and should be changes over time, how artists challenge and reinforce each other, and how even I, a complete art novice, know what different schools of art, like Bauhaus or Impressionism, are.A bigger contrast with what currently dominates our society is hard to imagine. Although we’ve made the economy the centerpiece of civilization, we hardly know anything about its different schools of thoughts. And yet we could learn so much from the changing perspectives in our economy. The development of the steam engine is seen as a driving factor for the industrial revolution, but we should never forget that it was one of many developments that shaped how communities and companies organized themselves, from resource use to family life to even art. The industrial revolution didn’t happen in one year, it took decades, maybe even a full century. There were winners that saw the future and moved with it. And there were losers that tried to hold on to the past for too long.… “And now Guido will tell you all about what happened in 2014!”, I suddenly hear. In a split second I am back at the General Annual Meeting, enthusiastically talking about all the small steps we took that might become big leaps towards irreversible change one day.Usually, a development like the industrial revolution or a new movement in art takes some time to be recognized and named. How different that is for the circular economy. It is still in its infancy, but we’ve already labeled it. And maybe that explains why we are so impatient. If it is so logical, then why isn’t our economy circular yet? We live in exponential times in many ways, and we expect disruption to happen overnight. The reality is that we have to work hard to make a circular economy happen, that we have to create little pieces of art everyday that all together paint the circular picture.The Annual General Meeting comes to an end. The members agree to appoint Herman Wijffels as new board member of the Circle Economy Cooperative. I deeply respect this man, for it was because of his wise words that I came to understand that we human beings have a shared conscious, that is slowly beginning to understand that we have entered a new era. A new era that requires a new way of thinking and (inter)acting, that we are not fully able to grasp yet. We are entering an era in which entrepreneurs are the artists of our time. I would love to see whose names will show up on the historical overview of artists that made the transition towards a circular economy happen.I wish you all the best for 2015!Picture: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tate_Modern

The Economy as Art

Downloads

No items found.

Inspired by Tate Modern London - a blog by Guido BraamEvery blog that is written at the end of the year is undoubtedly related to the transition from one year to the next. Although we can memorize past days and imagine days to come all year long, when January is near, it is simply in our nature to reflect on where we are.I realized during our Annual General Meeting at the Crossboat at the Ceuvel that I’ve always found it difficult to define how successful the past year was. While our members hang their warm winter coats in this brand new meeting space, I quickly go over my presentation about Circle Economy’s results for 2014. I’m very proud of what we have achieved in just one year, but a little voice inside my head questions whether our hard work really brought us closer to the circular economy. Meanwhile, our founder Robert-Jan van Ogtrop welcomes our members.My mind wanders off to a lovely weekend with my wife in London, and to our visit to the Tate Modern Museum. Although the featured works are amazing, it is the historical overview of artists that have impacted how art developed, painted on a huge wall on the first floor, that struck me most of all. It is so impressive to see how the perception of what art is and should be changes over time, how artists challenge and reinforce each other, and how even I, a complete art novice, know what different schools of art, like Bauhaus or Impressionism, are.A bigger contrast with what currently dominates our society is hard to imagine. Although we’ve made the economy the centerpiece of civilization, we hardly know anything about its different schools of thoughts. And yet we could learn so much from the changing perspectives in our economy. The development of the steam engine is seen as a driving factor for the industrial revolution, but we should never forget that it was one of many developments that shaped how communities and companies organized themselves, from resource use to family life to even art. The industrial revolution didn’t happen in one year, it took decades, maybe even a full century. There were winners that saw the future and moved with it. And there were losers that tried to hold on to the past for too long.… “And now Guido will tell you all about what happened in 2014!”, I suddenly hear. In a split second I am back at the General Annual Meeting, enthusiastically talking about all the small steps we took that might become big leaps towards irreversible change one day.Usually, a development like the industrial revolution or a new movement in art takes some time to be recognized and named. How different that is for the circular economy. It is still in its infancy, but we’ve already labeled it. And maybe that explains why we are so impatient. If it is so logical, then why isn’t our economy circular yet? We live in exponential times in many ways, and we expect disruption to happen overnight. The reality is that we have to work hard to make a circular economy happen, that we have to create little pieces of art everyday that all together paint the circular picture.The Annual General Meeting comes to an end. The members agree to appoint Herman Wijffels as new board member of the Circle Economy Cooperative. I deeply respect this man, for it was because of his wise words that I came to understand that we human beings have a shared conscious, that is slowly beginning to understand that we have entered a new era. A new era that requires a new way of thinking and (inter)acting, that we are not fully able to grasp yet. We are entering an era in which entrepreneurs are the artists of our time. I would love to see whose names will show up on the historical overview of artists that made the transition towards a circular economy happen.I wish you all the best for 2015!Picture: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tate_Modern

PARTNERS & SUPPORTERS

No items found.
“Ends” Framework
‘Ends’ frameworks help us envision the dot on the horizon and ensure the end goal we are working towards takes key concepts that we care about into account.
“Means” Framework
‘Means’ frameworks provide us with the tools to translate visions into concrete realities. Where ‘ends’ frameworks put a dot on the horizon, ‘means’ frameworks pave the way.
The Economy as Art

Downloads

No items found.

Inspired by Tate Modern London - a blog by Guido BraamEvery blog that is written at the end of the year is undoubtedly related to the transition from one year to the next. Although we can memorize past days and imagine days to come all year long, when January is near, it is simply in our nature to reflect on where we are.I realized during our Annual General Meeting at the Crossboat at the Ceuvel that I’ve always found it difficult to define how successful the past year was. While our members hang their warm winter coats in this brand new meeting space, I quickly go over my presentation about Circle Economy’s results for 2014. I’m very proud of what we have achieved in just one year, but a little voice inside my head questions whether our hard work really brought us closer to the circular economy. Meanwhile, our founder Robert-Jan van Ogtrop welcomes our members.My mind wanders off to a lovely weekend with my wife in London, and to our visit to the Tate Modern Museum. Although the featured works are amazing, it is the historical overview of artists that have impacted how art developed, painted on a huge wall on the first floor, that struck me most of all. It is so impressive to see how the perception of what art is and should be changes over time, how artists challenge and reinforce each other, and how even I, a complete art novice, know what different schools of art, like Bauhaus or Impressionism, are.A bigger contrast with what currently dominates our society is hard to imagine. Although we’ve made the economy the centerpiece of civilization, we hardly know anything about its different schools of thoughts. And yet we could learn so much from the changing perspectives in our economy. The development of the steam engine is seen as a driving factor for the industrial revolution, but we should never forget that it was one of many developments that shaped how communities and companies organized themselves, from resource use to family life to even art. The industrial revolution didn’t happen in one year, it took decades, maybe even a full century. There were winners that saw the future and moved with it. And there were losers that tried to hold on to the past for too long.… “And now Guido will tell you all about what happened in 2014!”, I suddenly hear. In a split second I am back at the General Annual Meeting, enthusiastically talking about all the small steps we took that might become big leaps towards irreversible change one day.Usually, a development like the industrial revolution or a new movement in art takes some time to be recognized and named. How different that is for the circular economy. It is still in its infancy, but we’ve already labeled it. And maybe that explains why we are so impatient. If it is so logical, then why isn’t our economy circular yet? We live in exponential times in many ways, and we expect disruption to happen overnight. The reality is that we have to work hard to make a circular economy happen, that we have to create little pieces of art everyday that all together paint the circular picture.The Annual General Meeting comes to an end. The members agree to appoint Herman Wijffels as new board member of the Circle Economy Cooperative. I deeply respect this man, for it was because of his wise words that I came to understand that we human beings have a shared conscious, that is slowly beginning to understand that we have entered a new era. A new era that requires a new way of thinking and (inter)acting, that we are not fully able to grasp yet. We are entering an era in which entrepreneurs are the artists of our time. I would love to see whose names will show up on the historical overview of artists that made the transition towards a circular economy happen.I wish you all the best for 2015!Picture: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tate_Modern

STAY IN THE LOOP

GDPR Permissions and Content Preferences:

Thank you for signing up!

To complete the subscription process, please click the link in the email we just sent you.
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.