Roundabout Rotterdam: opportunities for a circular Zuidvleugel

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Rotterdam's Port Authority has the ambition to become the most sustainable port city in the world by 2015. In addition to conservation and impact reduction targets, one of the most exciting developments is the effort to accelerate the transition toward a circular economy. In the summer of 2014, Circle Economy, Circularity Center, and Rotterdam Partners joined forces to investigate the real potential for the Port region to become a global circular hotspot.Currently, Circle Economy and Circularity Center are preparing a Circle Scan for the Rotterdam region (Zuidvleugel) to map the circular opportunities for the region, as part of the Roundabout Rotterdam program. The Circle Scan will serve a basis for a high-level event organised in January 2015 by Rotterdam Partners, during which city officials and captains of industry will develop an action plan to start impactful, circular projects.In the Circle Scan process, we will zoom in from a global level (Rotterdam as a transportation node) to the possibilities for symbiosis on the level of the Zuidvleugel to material chain interventions on a local level. Areas that are identified as potentially impactful are:

  • From a primary to a secondary resources hub: Historically Rotterdam has been importing vast amounts of bulk, ranging from grains to vegetable oils and from oil to coal. From a sustainability perspective and because margins have come under pressure the allocation of residual secondary streams to new purposes has received increasing attention (e.g. the use of CO2 for the horticulture industry, or phosphate rich residue streams for fertilizers)
  • New business models (e.g. chemical leasing): It might be interesting to look for opportunities for new business models, such as chemical leasing, where users only pay for the services rendered by the chemicals (e.g. volume of water treated, number of parts painted, lengths of pipes cleaned, etc.) and not for the volume of chemicals consumed.
  • Manufacturing and remanufacturing: Rotterdam historically has been focused on two extremes of the spectrum: the import, processing and transshipping of primary resources, and the import and sale of finished products like cars. A more prominent focus on closing material loops and extending product lifecycle can offer opportunities to create more jobs for unskilled labour.

During the last Unconference (our quarterly member meeting) on September 4 we’ve gained some additional valuable insights for impact areas. We expect to be able to present the results of the Circle Scan in November.Do you have ideas for making the Zuidvleugel circular, or is your Zuidvleugel-based organization interested in the results? Contact Marc de Wit.Picture: Christian van Elven

September 10, 2014

Roundabout Rotterdam: opportunities for a circular Zuidvleugel

Rotterdam's Port Authority has the ambition to become the most sustainable port city in the world by 2015. In addition to conservation and impact reduction targets, one of the most exciting developments is the effort to accelerate the transition toward a circular economy. In the summer of 2014, Circle Economy, Circularity Center, and Rotterdam Partners joined forces to investigate the real potential for the Port region to become a global circular hotspot.

Rotterdam's Port Authority has the ambition to become the most sustainable port city in the world by 2015. In addition to conservation and impact reduction targets, one of the most exciting developments is the effort to accelerate the transition toward a circular economy. In the summer of 2014, Circle Economy, Circularity Center, and Rotterdam Partners joined forces to investigate the real potential for the Port region to become a global circular hotspot.Currently, Circle Economy and Circularity Center are preparing a Circle Scan for the Rotterdam region (Zuidvleugel) to map the circular opportunities for the region, as part of the Roundabout Rotterdam program. The Circle Scan will serve a basis for a high-level event organised in January 2015 by Rotterdam Partners, during which city officials and captains of industry will develop an action plan to start impactful, circular projects.In the Circle Scan process, we will zoom in from a global level (Rotterdam as a transportation node) to the possibilities for symbiosis on the level of the Zuidvleugel to material chain interventions on a local level. Areas that are identified as potentially impactful are:

  • From a primary to a secondary resources hub: Historically Rotterdam has been importing vast amounts of bulk, ranging from grains to vegetable oils and from oil to coal. From a sustainability perspective and because margins have come under pressure the allocation of residual secondary streams to new purposes has received increasing attention (e.g. the use of CO2 for the horticulture industry, or phosphate rich residue streams for fertilizers)
  • New business models (e.g. chemical leasing): It might be interesting to look for opportunities for new business models, such as chemical leasing, where users only pay for the services rendered by the chemicals (e.g. volume of water treated, number of parts painted, lengths of pipes cleaned, etc.) and not for the volume of chemicals consumed.
  • Manufacturing and remanufacturing: Rotterdam historically has been focused on two extremes of the spectrum: the import, processing and transshipping of primary resources, and the import and sale of finished products like cars. A more prominent focus on closing material loops and extending product lifecycle can offer opportunities to create more jobs for unskilled labour.

During the last Unconference (our quarterly member meeting) on September 4 we’ve gained some additional valuable insights for impact areas. We expect to be able to present the results of the Circle Scan in November.Do you have ideas for making the Zuidvleugel circular, or is your Zuidvleugel-based organization interested in the results? Contact Marc de Wit.Picture: Christian van Elven

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December 5, 2019

Roundabout Rotterdam: opportunities for a circular Zuidvleugel

Roundabout Rotterdam: opportunities for a circular Zuidvleugel

Rotterdam's Port Authority has the ambition to become the most sustainable port city in the world by 2015. In addition to conservation and impact reduction targets, one of the most exciting developments is the effort to accelerate the transition toward a circular economy. In the summer of 2014, Circle Economy, Circularity Center, and Rotterdam Partners joined forces to investigate the real potential for the Port region to become a global circular hotspot.Currently, Circle Economy and Circularity Center are preparing a Circle Scan for the Rotterdam region (Zuidvleugel) to map the circular opportunities for the region, as part of the Roundabout Rotterdam program. The Circle Scan will serve a basis for a high-level event organised in January 2015 by Rotterdam Partners, during which city officials and captains of industry will develop an action plan to start impactful, circular projects.In the Circle Scan process, we will zoom in from a global level (Rotterdam as a transportation node) to the possibilities for symbiosis on the level of the Zuidvleugel to material chain interventions on a local level. Areas that are identified as potentially impactful are:

  • From a primary to a secondary resources hub: Historically Rotterdam has been importing vast amounts of bulk, ranging from grains to vegetable oils and from oil to coal. From a sustainability perspective and because margins have come under pressure the allocation of residual secondary streams to new purposes has received increasing attention (e.g. the use of CO2 for the horticulture industry, or phosphate rich residue streams for fertilizers)
  • New business models (e.g. chemical leasing): It might be interesting to look for opportunities for new business models, such as chemical leasing, where users only pay for the services rendered by the chemicals (e.g. volume of water treated, number of parts painted, lengths of pipes cleaned, etc.) and not for the volume of chemicals consumed.
  • Manufacturing and remanufacturing: Rotterdam historically has been focused on two extremes of the spectrum: the import, processing and transshipping of primary resources, and the import and sale of finished products like cars. A more prominent focus on closing material loops and extending product lifecycle can offer opportunities to create more jobs for unskilled labour.

During the last Unconference (our quarterly member meeting) on September 4 we’ve gained some additional valuable insights for impact areas. We expect to be able to present the results of the Circle Scan in November.Do you have ideas for making the Zuidvleugel circular, or is your Zuidvleugel-based organization interested in the results? Contact Marc de Wit.Picture: Christian van Elven

Roundabout Rotterdam: opportunities for a circular Zuidvleugel

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Rotterdam's Port Authority has the ambition to become the most sustainable port city in the world by 2015. In addition to conservation and impact reduction targets, one of the most exciting developments is the effort to accelerate the transition toward a circular economy. In the summer of 2014, Circle Economy, Circularity Center, and Rotterdam Partners joined forces to investigate the real potential for the Port region to become a global circular hotspot.Currently, Circle Economy and Circularity Center are preparing a Circle Scan for the Rotterdam region (Zuidvleugel) to map the circular opportunities for the region, as part of the Roundabout Rotterdam program. The Circle Scan will serve a basis for a high-level event organised in January 2015 by Rotterdam Partners, during which city officials and captains of industry will develop an action plan to start impactful, circular projects.In the Circle Scan process, we will zoom in from a global level (Rotterdam as a transportation node) to the possibilities for symbiosis on the level of the Zuidvleugel to material chain interventions on a local level. Areas that are identified as potentially impactful are:

  • From a primary to a secondary resources hub: Historically Rotterdam has been importing vast amounts of bulk, ranging from grains to vegetable oils and from oil to coal. From a sustainability perspective and because margins have come under pressure the allocation of residual secondary streams to new purposes has received increasing attention (e.g. the use of CO2 for the horticulture industry, or phosphate rich residue streams for fertilizers)
  • New business models (e.g. chemical leasing): It might be interesting to look for opportunities for new business models, such as chemical leasing, where users only pay for the services rendered by the chemicals (e.g. volume of water treated, number of parts painted, lengths of pipes cleaned, etc.) and not for the volume of chemicals consumed.
  • Manufacturing and remanufacturing: Rotterdam historically has been focused on two extremes of the spectrum: the import, processing and transshipping of primary resources, and the import and sale of finished products like cars. A more prominent focus on closing material loops and extending product lifecycle can offer opportunities to create more jobs for unskilled labour.

During the last Unconference (our quarterly member meeting) on September 4 we’ve gained some additional valuable insights for impact areas. We expect to be able to present the results of the Circle Scan in November.Do you have ideas for making the Zuidvleugel circular, or is your Zuidvleugel-based organization interested in the results? Contact Marc de Wit.Picture: Christian van Elven

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Roundabout Rotterdam: opportunities for a circular Zuidvleugel

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Rotterdam's Port Authority has the ambition to become the most sustainable port city in the world by 2015. In addition to conservation and impact reduction targets, one of the most exciting developments is the effort to accelerate the transition toward a circular economy. In the summer of 2014, Circle Economy, Circularity Center, and Rotterdam Partners joined forces to investigate the real potential for the Port region to become a global circular hotspot.Currently, Circle Economy and Circularity Center are preparing a Circle Scan for the Rotterdam region (Zuidvleugel) to map the circular opportunities for the region, as part of the Roundabout Rotterdam program. The Circle Scan will serve a basis for a high-level event organised in January 2015 by Rotterdam Partners, during which city officials and captains of industry will develop an action plan to start impactful, circular projects.In the Circle Scan process, we will zoom in from a global level (Rotterdam as a transportation node) to the possibilities for symbiosis on the level of the Zuidvleugel to material chain interventions on a local level. Areas that are identified as potentially impactful are:

  • From a primary to a secondary resources hub: Historically Rotterdam has been importing vast amounts of bulk, ranging from grains to vegetable oils and from oil to coal. From a sustainability perspective and because margins have come under pressure the allocation of residual secondary streams to new purposes has received increasing attention (e.g. the use of CO2 for the horticulture industry, or phosphate rich residue streams for fertilizers)
  • New business models (e.g. chemical leasing): It might be interesting to look for opportunities for new business models, such as chemical leasing, where users only pay for the services rendered by the chemicals (e.g. volume of water treated, number of parts painted, lengths of pipes cleaned, etc.) and not for the volume of chemicals consumed.
  • Manufacturing and remanufacturing: Rotterdam historically has been focused on two extremes of the spectrum: the import, processing and transshipping of primary resources, and the import and sale of finished products like cars. A more prominent focus on closing material loops and extending product lifecycle can offer opportunities to create more jobs for unskilled labour.

During the last Unconference (our quarterly member meeting) on September 4 we’ve gained some additional valuable insights for impact areas. We expect to be able to present the results of the Circle Scan in November.Do you have ideas for making the Zuidvleugel circular, or is your Zuidvleugel-based organization interested in the results? Contact Marc de Wit.Picture: Christian van Elven

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