Preannouncement: boosting product value through smart reuse

Download Download

Companies are missing out on revenues that can be made by reusing products and materials in a smart way, is a key conclusion by Circle Economy, Het Groene Brein and MVO Nederland in a report for the Dutch Ministry of Infrastructure and Environment that will be published later this summer.To illustrate the value of smart reuse, think about the following everyday objects that we currently mostly dispose after use. For used phones with an original value of €850,- smart reuse would provide a monetary value of €410,- (48% of the original value), while the material value after recycling is only €1,- (0,1%). A new car of €12705,- has a value of €675 (5%) when reused, and of €190,- (1,5%) when recycled. Lastly, a batch of T-shirts of €35000,- has a value of €3370,- (10%) when reused and of only €157,- (0,4%) when recycled.

reuse vs recycle

Although the Netherlands are considered to be frontrunners when it comes to waste treatment (we recycle 67% of our waste and burn only 15%), products that are now considered as waste might in fact be very valuable when we reuse them in a smarter way. The authors distinguish between 5 levels of reuse and recommend companies to consider how much value they can retain through smarter reuse of their products based on the product’s recoverability, technological maturity, breakdown rate, and number and level of integration of the components of the product:

  1. Reselling a used product that is still functioning (like phones through ecoATM)
  2. Repairing broken products (like Wetering Rotterdam, one of the oldest ship repair companies in North Western Europe)
  3. Upgrading used products so they live up to current standards(like Schurgers Design is upgrading police bikes)
  4. Refurbishing or remanufacturing products and components by replacing old parts (like the remanufactured engines and engine parts of VEGE)
  5. Repurpose products and components in a different context (like the playground made out of old wind turbines by Superuse Studios)

Based on these insights the authors are currently developing a practical tool that shows companies how they can create value by smarter reuse of existing products. In the coming months the tool will be tested for three products groups (IT solutions, city infrastructure, and trucks). The tool will be available in Autumn 2015.For more information please contact Shyaam Ramkumar.

August 14, 2015

Preannouncement: boosting product value through smart reuse

Companies are missing out on revenues that can be made by reusing products and materials in a smart way, is a key conclusion by Circle Economy, Het Groene Brein and MVO Nederland in a report for the Dutch Ministry of Infrastructure and Environment that will be published later this summer.

Companies are missing out on revenues that can be made by reusing products and materials in a smart way, is a key conclusion by Circle Economy, Het Groene Brein and MVO Nederland in a report for the Dutch Ministry of Infrastructure and Environment that will be published later this summer.To illustrate the value of smart reuse, think about the following everyday objects that we currently mostly dispose after use. For used phones with an original value of €850,- smart reuse would provide a monetary value of €410,- (48% of the original value), while the material value after recycling is only €1,- (0,1%). A new car of €12705,- has a value of €675 (5%) when reused, and of €190,- (1,5%) when recycled. Lastly, a batch of T-shirts of €35000,- has a value of €3370,- (10%) when reused and of only €157,- (0,4%) when recycled.

reuse vs recycle

Although the Netherlands are considered to be frontrunners when it comes to waste treatment (we recycle 67% of our waste and burn only 15%), products that are now considered as waste might in fact be very valuable when we reuse them in a smarter way. The authors distinguish between 5 levels of reuse and recommend companies to consider how much value they can retain through smarter reuse of their products based on the product’s recoverability, technological maturity, breakdown rate, and number and level of integration of the components of the product:

  1. Reselling a used product that is still functioning (like phones through ecoATM)
  2. Repairing broken products (like Wetering Rotterdam, one of the oldest ship repair companies in North Western Europe)
  3. Upgrading used products so they live up to current standards(like Schurgers Design is upgrading police bikes)
  4. Refurbishing or remanufacturing products and components by replacing old parts (like the remanufactured engines and engine parts of VEGE)
  5. Repurpose products and components in a different context (like the playground made out of old wind turbines by Superuse Studios)

Based on these insights the authors are currently developing a practical tool that shows companies how they can create value by smarter reuse of existing products. In the coming months the tool will be tested for three products groups (IT solutions, city infrastructure, and trucks). The tool will be available in Autumn 2015.For more information please contact Shyaam Ramkumar.

STAY IN THE LOOP

GDPR Permissions and Content Preferences:

Thank you for signing up!

To complete the subscription process, please click the link in the email we just sent you.
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
December 5, 2019

Preannouncement: boosting product value through smart reuse

Preannouncement: boosting product value through smart reuse

Companies are missing out on revenues that can be made by reusing products and materials in a smart way, is a key conclusion by Circle Economy, Het Groene Brein and MVO Nederland in a report for the Dutch Ministry of Infrastructure and Environment that will be published later this summer.To illustrate the value of smart reuse, think about the following everyday objects that we currently mostly dispose after use. For used phones with an original value of €850,- smart reuse would provide a monetary value of €410,- (48% of the original value), while the material value after recycling is only €1,- (0,1%). A new car of €12705,- has a value of €675 (5%) when reused, and of €190,- (1,5%) when recycled. Lastly, a batch of T-shirts of €35000,- has a value of €3370,- (10%) when reused and of only €157,- (0,4%) when recycled.

reuse vs recycle

Although the Netherlands are considered to be frontrunners when it comes to waste treatment (we recycle 67% of our waste and burn only 15%), products that are now considered as waste might in fact be very valuable when we reuse them in a smarter way. The authors distinguish between 5 levels of reuse and recommend companies to consider how much value they can retain through smarter reuse of their products based on the product’s recoverability, technological maturity, breakdown rate, and number and level of integration of the components of the product:

  1. Reselling a used product that is still functioning (like phones through ecoATM)
  2. Repairing broken products (like Wetering Rotterdam, one of the oldest ship repair companies in North Western Europe)
  3. Upgrading used products so they live up to current standards(like Schurgers Design is upgrading police bikes)
  4. Refurbishing or remanufacturing products and components by replacing old parts (like the remanufactured engines and engine parts of VEGE)
  5. Repurpose products and components in a different context (like the playground made out of old wind turbines by Superuse Studios)

Based on these insights the authors are currently developing a practical tool that shows companies how they can create value by smarter reuse of existing products. In the coming months the tool will be tested for three products groups (IT solutions, city infrastructure, and trucks). The tool will be available in Autumn 2015.For more information please contact Shyaam Ramkumar.

Preannouncement: boosting product value through smart reuse

Downloads

No items found.

Companies are missing out on revenues that can be made by reusing products and materials in a smart way, is a key conclusion by Circle Economy, Het Groene Brein and MVO Nederland in a report for the Dutch Ministry of Infrastructure and Environment that will be published later this summer.To illustrate the value of smart reuse, think about the following everyday objects that we currently mostly dispose after use. For used phones with an original value of €850,- smart reuse would provide a monetary value of €410,- (48% of the original value), while the material value after recycling is only €1,- (0,1%). A new car of €12705,- has a value of €675 (5%) when reused, and of €190,- (1,5%) when recycled. Lastly, a batch of T-shirts of €35000,- has a value of €3370,- (10%) when reused and of only €157,- (0,4%) when recycled.

reuse vs recycle

Although the Netherlands are considered to be frontrunners when it comes to waste treatment (we recycle 67% of our waste and burn only 15%), products that are now considered as waste might in fact be very valuable when we reuse them in a smarter way. The authors distinguish between 5 levels of reuse and recommend companies to consider how much value they can retain through smarter reuse of their products based on the product’s recoverability, technological maturity, breakdown rate, and number and level of integration of the components of the product:

  1. Reselling a used product that is still functioning (like phones through ecoATM)
  2. Repairing broken products (like Wetering Rotterdam, one of the oldest ship repair companies in North Western Europe)
  3. Upgrading used products so they live up to current standards(like Schurgers Design is upgrading police bikes)
  4. Refurbishing or remanufacturing products and components by replacing old parts (like the remanufactured engines and engine parts of VEGE)
  5. Repurpose products and components in a different context (like the playground made out of old wind turbines by Superuse Studios)

Based on these insights the authors are currently developing a practical tool that shows companies how they can create value by smarter reuse of existing products. In the coming months the tool will be tested for three products groups (IT solutions, city infrastructure, and trucks). The tool will be available in Autumn 2015.For more information please contact Shyaam Ramkumar.

PARTNERS & SUPPORTERS

No items found.
“Ends” Framework
‘Ends’ frameworks help us envision the dot on the horizon and ensure the end goal we are working towards takes key concepts that we care about into account.
“Means” Framework
‘Means’ frameworks provide us with the tools to translate visions into concrete realities. Where ‘ends’ frameworks put a dot on the horizon, ‘means’ frameworks pave the way.
Preannouncement: boosting product value through smart reuse

Downloads

No items found.

Companies are missing out on revenues that can be made by reusing products and materials in a smart way, is a key conclusion by Circle Economy, Het Groene Brein and MVO Nederland in a report for the Dutch Ministry of Infrastructure and Environment that will be published later this summer.To illustrate the value of smart reuse, think about the following everyday objects that we currently mostly dispose after use. For used phones with an original value of €850,- smart reuse would provide a monetary value of €410,- (48% of the original value), while the material value after recycling is only €1,- (0,1%). A new car of €12705,- has a value of €675 (5%) when reused, and of €190,- (1,5%) when recycled. Lastly, a batch of T-shirts of €35000,- has a value of €3370,- (10%) when reused and of only €157,- (0,4%) when recycled.

reuse vs recycle

Although the Netherlands are considered to be frontrunners when it comes to waste treatment (we recycle 67% of our waste and burn only 15%), products that are now considered as waste might in fact be very valuable when we reuse them in a smarter way. The authors distinguish between 5 levels of reuse and recommend companies to consider how much value they can retain through smarter reuse of their products based on the product’s recoverability, technological maturity, breakdown rate, and number and level of integration of the components of the product:

  1. Reselling a used product that is still functioning (like phones through ecoATM)
  2. Repairing broken products (like Wetering Rotterdam, one of the oldest ship repair companies in North Western Europe)
  3. Upgrading used products so they live up to current standards(like Schurgers Design is upgrading police bikes)
  4. Refurbishing or remanufacturing products and components by replacing old parts (like the remanufactured engines and engine parts of VEGE)
  5. Repurpose products and components in a different context (like the playground made out of old wind turbines by Superuse Studios)

Based on these insights the authors are currently developing a practical tool that shows companies how they can create value by smarter reuse of existing products. In the coming months the tool will be tested for three products groups (IT solutions, city infrastructure, and trucks). The tool will be available in Autumn 2015.For more information please contact Shyaam Ramkumar.

STAY IN THE LOOP

GDPR Permissions and Content Preferences:

Thank you for signing up!

To complete the subscription process, please click the link in the email we just sent you.
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.