Mining the Sea – The case of CRS Holland

Download Download

A blog by Chloe de Roos Feinberg and Merve GuvendikAlthough it feels as though the data we use in our lives is transferred wirelessly, in reality 95% of global data usage is transferred through deep sea cables. The consequence of our increased connectivity has meant that over the past 150 years, $2,7 billion worth of copper has been sunk into the sea in the form of cables, as well as $363 million worth of steel; and $917 million worth of of plastic (in today’s monetary terms). Circle Economy has worked with CRS Holland, a Dutch company which specializes in the recovery of these deep sea cables. Using a highly trained crew, state of the art equipment and materials and with partnerships with the associations that manage the deep sea cable infrastructure, not only is the CRS Holland story a fascinating business case but also an excellent example of how circularity can be applied in areas where it would be otherwise least expected.

CRS graph

Currently, there are three main options for what happens to out of date deep sea cables. The first option is that the cables are upgraded. Between 2013 and 2014 alone, 27 cable systems have been upgraded. This is becoming especially easier now that cables are fiber optic and the technology to upgrade cables improves.The second option is to reuse the cable. By disconnecting and relocating older cables, thecost of connection for a country can drop by 20%-30%. This option is especially attractive for connecting island nations. Connecting new cable for a country comes at a cost of roughly $ 24,000 per kilometer. By reusing older, but still functioning, cable the cost per kilometer can drop to $ 20,000. This, when talking about kilometers upon kilometers of cable connection on the sea floor, can be a significant savings for certain nations.The third option for the old cables is in recycling the cable materials. To date, approximately 30,000 kilometers of cable have been recycled. This is the equivalent of 30% of all cable installed in 2015. Of that 16,624 kilometers of cable has been recovered by CRS Holland and recycled. This cables alone recovered by CRS Holland is the equivalent of 54,000 tons of CO2 emissions, the equivalent of the yearly emissions of 13,500 cars.The reusing and recycling of cables takes advantage of resources, many of which are going unused, just lying on the floor. Although, CRS Holland and other companies in the cables recovery business are pioneering in this field, still over 94% of cables on the sea floor are waiting to be recovered.Beyond traditional recyclingMuch is known about the recycling markets for aluminum, steel and copper. However, a more challenging material is plastics, specifically the HDPE and LDPE used in coax and fibre optic cables. Currently there is 0.9 million tons of LDPE buried on the sea floor in the form of cables. That is the equivalent of 12% of the total LDPE demand in Europe each year or 2.3 million tons of CO2 emissions from virgin materials. If the LDPE currently buried in cables was recovered, it would be enough to produce 4.7 million kilometers of fiber optic cables or 19.7 million cleaning product bottles on average.The case for recovery of deep sea cables is present both from a financial and environmental point of view. What is needed now is telecom companies to take a greater role in cable recovery and use their influence over the deep sea cable industry to champion proper cable recovery practices. If you are interested in finding out more, please contact Vera Moll (Circle Economy), or Friso Tammes or Arne de Jong (CRS Holland).For more information, check out the CRS Holland flyer.

October 13, 2015

Mining the Sea – The case of CRS Holland

Circle Economy has worked with CRS Holland, a Dutch company which specializes in the recovery of these deep sea cables. Using a highly trained crew, state of the art equipment and materials and with partnerships with the associations that manage the deep sea cable infrastructure, not only is the CRS Holland story a fascinating business case but also an excellent example of how circularity can be applied in areas where it would be otherwise least expected.

A blog by Chloe de Roos Feinberg and Merve GuvendikAlthough it feels as though the data we use in our lives is transferred wirelessly, in reality 95% of global data usage is transferred through deep sea cables. The consequence of our increased connectivity has meant that over the past 150 years, $2,7 billion worth of copper has been sunk into the sea in the form of cables, as well as $363 million worth of steel; and $917 million worth of of plastic (in today’s monetary terms). Circle Economy has worked with CRS Holland, a Dutch company which specializes in the recovery of these deep sea cables. Using a highly trained crew, state of the art equipment and materials and with partnerships with the associations that manage the deep sea cable infrastructure, not only is the CRS Holland story a fascinating business case but also an excellent example of how circularity can be applied in areas where it would be otherwise least expected.

CRS graph

Currently, there are three main options for what happens to out of date deep sea cables. The first option is that the cables are upgraded. Between 2013 and 2014 alone, 27 cable systems have been upgraded. This is becoming especially easier now that cables are fiber optic and the technology to upgrade cables improves.The second option is to reuse the cable. By disconnecting and relocating older cables, thecost of connection for a country can drop by 20%-30%. This option is especially attractive for connecting island nations. Connecting new cable for a country comes at a cost of roughly $ 24,000 per kilometer. By reusing older, but still functioning, cable the cost per kilometer can drop to $ 20,000. This, when talking about kilometers upon kilometers of cable connection on the sea floor, can be a significant savings for certain nations.The third option for the old cables is in recycling the cable materials. To date, approximately 30,000 kilometers of cable have been recycled. This is the equivalent of 30% of all cable installed in 2015. Of that 16,624 kilometers of cable has been recovered by CRS Holland and recycled. This cables alone recovered by CRS Holland is the equivalent of 54,000 tons of CO2 emissions, the equivalent of the yearly emissions of 13,500 cars.The reusing and recycling of cables takes advantage of resources, many of which are going unused, just lying on the floor. Although, CRS Holland and other companies in the cables recovery business are pioneering in this field, still over 94% of cables on the sea floor are waiting to be recovered.Beyond traditional recyclingMuch is known about the recycling markets for aluminum, steel and copper. However, a more challenging material is plastics, specifically the HDPE and LDPE used in coax and fibre optic cables. Currently there is 0.9 million tons of LDPE buried on the sea floor in the form of cables. That is the equivalent of 12% of the total LDPE demand in Europe each year or 2.3 million tons of CO2 emissions from virgin materials. If the LDPE currently buried in cables was recovered, it would be enough to produce 4.7 million kilometers of fiber optic cables or 19.7 million cleaning product bottles on average.The case for recovery of deep sea cables is present both from a financial and environmental point of view. What is needed now is telecom companies to take a greater role in cable recovery and use their influence over the deep sea cable industry to champion proper cable recovery practices. If you are interested in finding out more, please contact Vera Moll (Circle Economy), or Friso Tammes or Arne de Jong (CRS Holland).For more information, check out the CRS Holland flyer.

STAY IN THE LOOP

GDPR Permissions and Content Preferences:

Thank you for signing up!

To complete the subscription process, please click the link in the email we just sent you.
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
December 5, 2019

Mining the Sea – The case of CRS Holland

Mining the Sea – The case of CRS Holland

A blog by Chloe de Roos Feinberg and Merve GuvendikAlthough it feels as though the data we use in our lives is transferred wirelessly, in reality 95% of global data usage is transferred through deep sea cables. The consequence of our increased connectivity has meant that over the past 150 years, $2,7 billion worth of copper has been sunk into the sea in the form of cables, as well as $363 million worth of steel; and $917 million worth of of plastic (in today’s monetary terms). Circle Economy has worked with CRS Holland, a Dutch company which specializes in the recovery of these deep sea cables. Using a highly trained crew, state of the art equipment and materials and with partnerships with the associations that manage the deep sea cable infrastructure, not only is the CRS Holland story a fascinating business case but also an excellent example of how circularity can be applied in areas where it would be otherwise least expected.

CRS graph

Currently, there are three main options for what happens to out of date deep sea cables. The first option is that the cables are upgraded. Between 2013 and 2014 alone, 27 cable systems have been upgraded. This is becoming especially easier now that cables are fiber optic and the technology to upgrade cables improves.The second option is to reuse the cable. By disconnecting and relocating older cables, thecost of connection for a country can drop by 20%-30%. This option is especially attractive for connecting island nations. Connecting new cable for a country comes at a cost of roughly $ 24,000 per kilometer. By reusing older, but still functioning, cable the cost per kilometer can drop to $ 20,000. This, when talking about kilometers upon kilometers of cable connection on the sea floor, can be a significant savings for certain nations.The third option for the old cables is in recycling the cable materials. To date, approximately 30,000 kilometers of cable have been recycled. This is the equivalent of 30% of all cable installed in 2015. Of that 16,624 kilometers of cable has been recovered by CRS Holland and recycled. This cables alone recovered by CRS Holland is the equivalent of 54,000 tons of CO2 emissions, the equivalent of the yearly emissions of 13,500 cars.The reusing and recycling of cables takes advantage of resources, many of which are going unused, just lying on the floor. Although, CRS Holland and other companies in the cables recovery business are pioneering in this field, still over 94% of cables on the sea floor are waiting to be recovered.Beyond traditional recyclingMuch is known about the recycling markets for aluminum, steel and copper. However, a more challenging material is plastics, specifically the HDPE and LDPE used in coax and fibre optic cables. Currently there is 0.9 million tons of LDPE buried on the sea floor in the form of cables. That is the equivalent of 12% of the total LDPE demand in Europe each year or 2.3 million tons of CO2 emissions from virgin materials. If the LDPE currently buried in cables was recovered, it would be enough to produce 4.7 million kilometers of fiber optic cables or 19.7 million cleaning product bottles on average.The case for recovery of deep sea cables is present both from a financial and environmental point of view. What is needed now is telecom companies to take a greater role in cable recovery and use their influence over the deep sea cable industry to champion proper cable recovery practices. If you are interested in finding out more, please contact Vera Moll (Circle Economy), or Friso Tammes or Arne de Jong (CRS Holland).For more information, check out the CRS Holland flyer.

Mining the Sea – The case of CRS Holland

Downloads

No items found.

A blog by Chloe de Roos Feinberg and Merve GuvendikAlthough it feels as though the data we use in our lives is transferred wirelessly, in reality 95% of global data usage is transferred through deep sea cables. The consequence of our increased connectivity has meant that over the past 150 years, $2,7 billion worth of copper has been sunk into the sea in the form of cables, as well as $363 million worth of steel; and $917 million worth of of plastic (in today’s monetary terms). Circle Economy has worked with CRS Holland, a Dutch company which specializes in the recovery of these deep sea cables. Using a highly trained crew, state of the art equipment and materials and with partnerships with the associations that manage the deep sea cable infrastructure, not only is the CRS Holland story a fascinating business case but also an excellent example of how circularity can be applied in areas where it would be otherwise least expected.

CRS graph

Currently, there are three main options for what happens to out of date deep sea cables. The first option is that the cables are upgraded. Between 2013 and 2014 alone, 27 cable systems have been upgraded. This is becoming especially easier now that cables are fiber optic and the technology to upgrade cables improves.The second option is to reuse the cable. By disconnecting and relocating older cables, thecost of connection for a country can drop by 20%-30%. This option is especially attractive for connecting island nations. Connecting new cable for a country comes at a cost of roughly $ 24,000 per kilometer. By reusing older, but still functioning, cable the cost per kilometer can drop to $ 20,000. This, when talking about kilometers upon kilometers of cable connection on the sea floor, can be a significant savings for certain nations.The third option for the old cables is in recycling the cable materials. To date, approximately 30,000 kilometers of cable have been recycled. This is the equivalent of 30% of all cable installed in 2015. Of that 16,624 kilometers of cable has been recovered by CRS Holland and recycled. This cables alone recovered by CRS Holland is the equivalent of 54,000 tons of CO2 emissions, the equivalent of the yearly emissions of 13,500 cars.The reusing and recycling of cables takes advantage of resources, many of which are going unused, just lying on the floor. Although, CRS Holland and other companies in the cables recovery business are pioneering in this field, still over 94% of cables on the sea floor are waiting to be recovered.Beyond traditional recyclingMuch is known about the recycling markets for aluminum, steel and copper. However, a more challenging material is plastics, specifically the HDPE and LDPE used in coax and fibre optic cables. Currently there is 0.9 million tons of LDPE buried on the sea floor in the form of cables. That is the equivalent of 12% of the total LDPE demand in Europe each year or 2.3 million tons of CO2 emissions from virgin materials. If the LDPE currently buried in cables was recovered, it would be enough to produce 4.7 million kilometers of fiber optic cables or 19.7 million cleaning product bottles on average.The case for recovery of deep sea cables is present both from a financial and environmental point of view. What is needed now is telecom companies to take a greater role in cable recovery and use their influence over the deep sea cable industry to champion proper cable recovery practices. If you are interested in finding out more, please contact Vera Moll (Circle Economy), or Friso Tammes or Arne de Jong (CRS Holland).For more information, check out the CRS Holland flyer.

PARTNERS & SUPPORTERS

No items found.
“Ends” Framework
‘Ends’ frameworks help us envision the dot on the horizon and ensure the end goal we are working towards takes key concepts that we care about into account.
“Means” Framework
‘Means’ frameworks provide us with the tools to translate visions into concrete realities. Where ‘ends’ frameworks put a dot on the horizon, ‘means’ frameworks pave the way.
Mining the Sea – The case of CRS Holland

Downloads

No items found.

A blog by Chloe de Roos Feinberg and Merve GuvendikAlthough it feels as though the data we use in our lives is transferred wirelessly, in reality 95% of global data usage is transferred through deep sea cables. The consequence of our increased connectivity has meant that over the past 150 years, $2,7 billion worth of copper has been sunk into the sea in the form of cables, as well as $363 million worth of steel; and $917 million worth of of plastic (in today’s monetary terms). Circle Economy has worked with CRS Holland, a Dutch company which specializes in the recovery of these deep sea cables. Using a highly trained crew, state of the art equipment and materials and with partnerships with the associations that manage the deep sea cable infrastructure, not only is the CRS Holland story a fascinating business case but also an excellent example of how circularity can be applied in areas where it would be otherwise least expected.

CRS graph

Currently, there are three main options for what happens to out of date deep sea cables. The first option is that the cables are upgraded. Between 2013 and 2014 alone, 27 cable systems have been upgraded. This is becoming especially easier now that cables are fiber optic and the technology to upgrade cables improves.The second option is to reuse the cable. By disconnecting and relocating older cables, thecost of connection for a country can drop by 20%-30%. This option is especially attractive for connecting island nations. Connecting new cable for a country comes at a cost of roughly $ 24,000 per kilometer. By reusing older, but still functioning, cable the cost per kilometer can drop to $ 20,000. This, when talking about kilometers upon kilometers of cable connection on the sea floor, can be a significant savings for certain nations.The third option for the old cables is in recycling the cable materials. To date, approximately 30,000 kilometers of cable have been recycled. This is the equivalent of 30% of all cable installed in 2015. Of that 16,624 kilometers of cable has been recovered by CRS Holland and recycled. This cables alone recovered by CRS Holland is the equivalent of 54,000 tons of CO2 emissions, the equivalent of the yearly emissions of 13,500 cars.The reusing and recycling of cables takes advantage of resources, many of which are going unused, just lying on the floor. Although, CRS Holland and other companies in the cables recovery business are pioneering in this field, still over 94% of cables on the sea floor are waiting to be recovered.Beyond traditional recyclingMuch is known about the recycling markets for aluminum, steel and copper. However, a more challenging material is plastics, specifically the HDPE and LDPE used in coax and fibre optic cables. Currently there is 0.9 million tons of LDPE buried on the sea floor in the form of cables. That is the equivalent of 12% of the total LDPE demand in Europe each year or 2.3 million tons of CO2 emissions from virgin materials. If the LDPE currently buried in cables was recovered, it would be enough to produce 4.7 million kilometers of fiber optic cables or 19.7 million cleaning product bottles on average.The case for recovery of deep sea cables is present both from a financial and environmental point of view. What is needed now is telecom companies to take a greater role in cable recovery and use their influence over the deep sea cable industry to champion proper cable recovery practices. If you are interested in finding out more, please contact Vera Moll (Circle Economy), or Friso Tammes or Arne de Jong (CRS Holland).For more information, check out the CRS Holland flyer.

STAY IN THE LOOP

GDPR Permissions and Content Preferences:

Thank you for signing up!

To complete the subscription process, please click the link in the email we just sent you.
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.